By Kyle McCarthy

A key goal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), has been to reduce the number of uninsured Americans. Since major provisions of the ACA went into effect in January 2014, the uninsured rate has dropped to the lowest rate in decades. President-elect Donald Trump has vowed to repeal the ACA when he takes office, while other times, he has stated that he would keep certain provisions of it. Below are six reasons why repealing the Affordable Care Act is a terrible idea. 1.)24 million Americans will lose health insurance. Since the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was implemented, the uninsured…Read More

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By kaylalittle

Many people think that birth control is solely meant to prevent pregnancy. However, birth control has so many additional helpful tools to improve your daily life. Birth control can do wonders. Here are three OTHER reasons to use birth control: 1.) Regulate your period. Did you know you can control when you have your period or whether you have it at all? Birth control can allow you to never have your period again, or to always have your period every month and know when to expect it. You can also choose to have it 3-4 times per year and…Read More

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By Kyle McCarthy

In most countries in the world, women are able to access birth control without a prescription. However, with the exception of California and Oregon, women are unable to get birth over-the-counter in the United States. California and Oregon are two states which have passed laws to expand access to contraceptives and more states are expected to follow as well. In both states, the laws aim to make it so women can get oral contraceptives right from the pharmacist, but as we found out, more than six months after the bill has been enacted, it’s still nearly impossible to do…Read More

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By kaylalittle

Last April, the California Board of Pharmacy adopted regulations allowing pharmacists to dispense oral contraceptives, vaginal rings, and patches. But has much really changed? Over the past two weeks, I called over 130 pharmacies to see if I could get a prescription for birth control. Want to know how that turned out? ONE pharmacy said they could actually prescribe me birth control. That one pharmacist also had to actually look up how to actually do this, because he had never done this before. Kudos to him for actually knowing that this was even an option and for being willing to…Read More

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By Maryam

The Black Women’s Health Imperative (BWHI) is a national organization dedicated to improving the health and wellness of 21 million Black women and girls in this country. They focus on the most pressing health issues that face this population and create innovative strategies and programs to address them. According to BWHI President & CEO, Linda Goler Blount, the organization’s mission is to "ensure that Black women and girls live their healthiest lives emotionally, physically, and financially." Below, are two BWHI initiatives which are helping improve the health of black women and girls. My Sister’s Keeper According to BHWI, the…Read More

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By Jayne Gagliano

The AIDS Healthcare Foundation has spent about $17.7 million to pass Proposition 61. And there’s a VERY good reason that AHF and the organization’s CEO, Michael Weinstein, have done so (for them, at least). If passed, the California ballot measure will drive business to AHF’s pharmacies, the organization’s main source of revenue. AIDS Healthcare Foundation is the single largest health care provider to people living with HIV and AIDS in the United States, generating about $800 million in revenue, about 80% of which coming from their pharmacies. A 501(c)(3) non-profit has never spent so much to ensure a bill…Read More

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By Jayne Gagliano

This election cycle, the AIDS Healthcare Foundation has written and sponsored Proposition 60, a bill which would violate adult filmworkers’ privacy and weaken workplace safety. AHF has also spent nearly five million dollars to pass this California ballot measure. This harmful proposition would require adult film performers to use condoms during filming of sexual intercourse, require producers to pay for performer vaccinations, testing, and medical examinations, and require producers to post condom requirements at film sites. It would also allow any Californian to sue adult film performers who distribute or produce adult content which violates adult filmworkers’ privacy, and…Read More

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By Kyle McCarthy

Throughout his year-and-a-half long campaign, Donald Trump has spewed some of the most jarring hate speech we have ever witnessed from a presidential candidate. His comments have normalized blatant sexism and violence against women, which has serious impacts on women’s health and overall safety. Without further ado, here are 5 reasons a Trump presidency would be detrimental to women’s health: 1.) Numerous sexual assault allegations Trump has been accused of sexual assault by over twenty women--and counting. Currently, he is accused of raping a 13 year old girl, “Jane Doe”, in 1994. Read a thorough list of women who…Read More

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By Kyle McCarthy

Last April, the California Board of Pharmacy adopted regulations allowing pharmacists to dispense oral contraceptives, vaginal rings, and patches. But has much really changed? Over the past two weeks, Nurx team-member, Kayla Little, called over 130 pharmacies to see if she could get a prescription for birth control. Want to know how that turned out? ONE pharmacy said they could actually do this, though the pharmacist said he had to look up how to actually do it...Out of 138. Interested in seeing the results from Kayla's calls to San Francisco pharmacies? An interactive map and a table of all of…Read More

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By Jessica Knox

If you’re taking a combination birth control pill (estrogen + progestin): If you vomit more than 2 hours after taking an active birth control pill, you are still protected from pregnancy. If you vomit within 2 hours of taking an active pill, treat it as a missed pill and take another active pill right away. As long as you don’t throw up again, you are still protected from pregnancy. If you vomit after taking an inactive pill, don’t worry! You are still protected from pregnancy. If you have ongoing vomiting or diarrhea (3 or more watery stools in 24…Read More

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By Jessica Knox

If you experience any of the following symptoms, you should contact a doctor immediately, and be sure to report your use of birth control and any other medications: Abdominal pain (severe) Chest pain (severe), cough, shortness of breath, or sharp pain upon breathing in Headache (severe), dizziness, weakness, or numbness (especially if one-sided) Eye problems (vision loss or blurring) Speech problems (slurred or garbled speech) Severe leg pain (calf or thigh) When starting or switching birth control, some women experience side effects as their bodies get used to the new hormones. These side effects usually resolve within 3 months:…Read More

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By Jessica Knox

There is more than one way to start the pill. Use whichever method you prefer. Quick start: If you are certain you’re not pregnant, take your first COC the day you get your pills. (If you’re not certain, take a pregnancy test before taking the pill.) If you start the pill within 5 days after the start of your period, you are protected against pregnancy right away. For example, if you started your period Thursday morning, you have until Tuesday morning to start taking your pill and still be protected from pregnancy right away. If you start the pill…Read More

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By Jessica Knox

How to start the pill: There is more than one way to start the pill. Starting the pill the first day of your period is best, but you can also start any other day if that is more convenient for you. First day of period start: If you are just starting POPs, it is best to take your first pill on the first day of your period. Quick start: If you start the pill on any other day, you must use a backup method (like a condom) every time you have sex in the first 48 hours after starting…Read More

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By Jessica Knox

There is more than one way to start the pill. Use whichever method you prefer.   Quick start: If you are certain you’re not pregnant, take your first COC the day you get your pills. (If you’re not certain, take a pregnancy test before taking the pill.) If you start the pill within 5 days after the start of your period, you are protected against pregnancy right away. For example, if you started your period Thursday morning, you have until Tuesday morning to start taking your pill and still be protected from pregnancy right away. If you start the…Read More

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By Jessica Knox

There is more than one way to start the pill. Use whichever method you prefer.   Quick start: If you are certain you’re not pregnant, take your first COC the day you get your pills. (If you’re not certain, take a pregnancy test before taking the pill.) If you start the pill within 5 days after the start of your period, you are protected against pregnancy right away. For example, if you started your period Thursday morning, you have until Tuesday morning to start taking your pill and still be protected from pregnancy right away. If you start the…Read More

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By Jessica Knox

Periods often have a way of starting at the most inconvenient time - like on the day of a big presentation, or in the middle of a romantic weekend. But if you use the ring or any monophasic pill for birth control, you can skip periods when you want to. Is it safe to skip periods? Yup! There is no health risk to skipping periods. In fact, for women who have very painful or very heavy periods, skipping a period or several may even improve their quality of life. You can skip periods as often as you like, though…Read More

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By Jessica Knox

The easiest way to tell if your pills are monophasic is to look at your pill pack. If there are only two different colors of pills in the pack, they are monophasic - the 21 or 24 pills that are all the same color each contain the same amounts of progestin and estrogen. The 7 or 4 pills that are all the second color are the placebo pills and contain no hormones. If your pill pack contains pills of 3 or more different colors, your birth control is multiphasic. Each different color of pill contains different amounts of hormones.…Read More

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By Jessica Knox

Birth control pills, patches, and rings do not protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs) like chlamydia, gonorrhea, genital herpes, syphilis, HIV and others. The only way to have sex and protect yourself yourself from STIs is to use condoms and/or know 100% that your partner is STI-free. If you have any doubt, insist on using a condom! The CDC recommends that all sexually active women age 25 years and younger, as well as older women who have multiple sexual partners and/or a sex partner who has an STI, have annual chlamydia and gonorrhea screening. Additionally, all people age 13…Read More

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